Glen Lake

According to the Leelanau Conservancy “Glen Lake, framed by a dramatic rise of Sleeping Bear to the west, and surrounded by high-forested moraines to the east and south, presents one of the most recognizable landscapes in Michigan. The waters of Glen Lake are so pure that with increasing depth, on a clear day the water colors shift from sandy hues of the shallows through aquamarine to some of the deepest blue known anywhere.” A better description of Glen Lake cannot be found.

Local legend says that Glen Lake was recognized as “the most beautiful lake in the world” by National Geographic Magazine, (the magazine denies ever having published such a ranking), but anyone who has cast their eyes upon this body of water would agree with the legend. Glen Lake actually consists of two lakes: Big Glen and Little Glen, with a bridge that stretches over the narrow bit of water connecting the two. Little Glen Lake is below the Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Big Glen is less than a mile away from the town of Glen Arbor.

Cool things to do: canoe or kayak (rent one from Crystal River Outfitters), sail, paddle, or just hang out on a pontoon (rent them from On the Narrows Marina), waterski, wakeboard, wakeskate, or tube (rent the equipment and boat from Glen Craft Marina), or just relax in the water at the public access sites on the lake.

Check out the Glen Lake Association for in depth info about Glen Lake.

The Glen Lake Yacht Club is a great way to meet people and enjoy your favorite summer sports, from sailing to tennis.

Head into Glen Arbor for some great food and shopping.

Leelanau on Location

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1 reply
  1. farlane
    farlane says:

    The Glen Lake / Crystal River Management Plan (PDF) says:

    Glen Lake was finally separated from Lake Michigan as sand eroded from high bluffs to the east (Pyramid Point) and west (Sleeping Bear) and deposited large amounts of sand in Sleeping Bear Bay. Glen Lake is therefore known as an “embayment” lake – one that forms as a thickening sand bar cuts off a bay from the larger body of water.

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